Category Archives: PowerShell Scripting

Update to AppV launcher for Version 5

Just a quick note to say I’ve updated the AppV launcher tool to support Appv 5.

appv5

 

The app-V launcher tool is a self contained executable which lists your installed App-V packages and allows you to launch an executable in that virtual applications environment. This is particularly useful if you or your admins / users are not PowerShell friendly or you would prefer to not publish PowerShell scripts as programs.

You can get a copy of the latest version and/or it’s source code over here.

As an added benefit I’ve included source code for running PowerShell commands in .Net, so if you are interested in trying to do so grab the source code!

Viewing open files on a file server from powershell.

/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/windows_powershell_icon.png?w=58&h=58&h=58So this is a situation you should all be aware of in an SBC / VDI environment, despite all warnings, you’ve redirected folders to your network drive and your file servers are screaming in agony?

Having been in this situation recently, I needed to audit and report on the types of files open on the file server, my hunch was a certain select number of users were running applications (like *gulp* lotus notes) from the network share.

Disappointed with the powershell scripts on the interwebs, I decided to write my own function to perform this task:

[sourcecode language=”powershell”]
function get-openfiles{
param(
$computername=@($env:computername),
$verbose=$false)
$collection = @()
foreach ($computer in $computername){
$netfile = [ADSI]"WinNT://$computer/LanmanServer"

$netfile.Invoke("Resources") | foreach {
try{
$collection += New-Object PsObject -Property @{
Id = $_.GetType().InvokeMember("Name", ‘GetProperty’, $null, $_, $null)
itemPath = $_.GetType().InvokeMember("Path", ‘GetProperty’, $null, $_, $null)
UserName = $_.GetType().InvokeMember("User", ‘GetProperty’, $null, $_, $null)
LockCount = $_.GetType().InvokeMember("LockCount", ‘GetProperty’, $null, $_, $null)
Server = $computer
}
}
catch{
if ($verbose){write-warning $error[0]}
}
}
}
Return $collection
}
[/sourcecode]

The function above (get-openfiles) has been written to accept an array of servers to the command line and it will return the following items:

  • The ID of the open file.
  • The server it’s open from.
  • The username who has the file open.
  • The amount of locks the file has.

A couple of quick examples for using this command are below:


Retrieving open files from server1:


full

[sourcecode language=”powershell”]get-openfiles -computername server1 | select server,itempath,lockcount[/sourcecode]



Retrieve a count of open files that end with the nsf file type (Lotus Notes):


count

[sourcecode language=”powershell”](get-open files -computername server1,server2 | ? {$_.itempath -like "*.nsf*"}).count()[/sourcecode]



Retrieve a report of total open files on a number of file servers:


report

 

[sourcecode language=”powershell”]get-openfiles -computername server1,server2,server3,server4,server5 | group -property server[/sourcecode]

 

Monitoring Storage disk queue’s and IO with PowerShell

/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/windows_powershell_icon.png?w=58&h=58&h=58Here’s one that used to bother me alot. The problem usually went as follows:

“Your XenApp servers have very high disk queue’s and IO”

“What’s causing it?”

“dunno…”

With Server 2008, the task manager’s resource monitor feature will help you find these items. But in server 2003 this was a perilous task. The specific details for disk io per process are stored in performance monitor under each specific process running. Trying to analyse each process was a massive pain, but powershell can do some very clever work to help alleviate this!

I wrote two quick functions which act similar to “top” in linux for giving an on screen view, updating at interval of what exactly is creating IO activity. These two functions are:

get-IODataBytes:

storageio

Get-IODataOperations

storageioops

The code for these functions are below:

[sourcecode language=”powershell”]
function get-iodatabytes{
$result=(get-counter -counter "Process(*)IO Data Bytes/sec" -ea 0).countersamples | ? {$_.cookedvalue -gt 0} | select instancename,@{Name="SessionID";Expression={if ($_.path.contains("#")){($_.path.split("#)"))[1]}else{"0"}}},@{Name="IO Data Bytes/sec";Expression={[math]::Round($_.cookedvalue,0)}},@{Name="IO Data KBytes/sec";Expression={[math]::Round($_.cookedvalue / 1024,0)}} | sort -Descending "IO Data Bytes/sec" | ft
$currentqueue=(((get-counter -counter "PhysicalDisk(0 C:)Current Disk Queue Length" -ea 0).countersamples) | select cookedvalue).cookedvalue
clear
write-warning "Hit [CTRL] + [C] to exit live capture"
write-host "Current Disk queue: $currentqueue"
return $Result
}

FUnction get-IODataOperations {
$result=(get-counter -counter "Process(*)IO Data Operations/sec" -ea 0).countersamples | ? {$_.cookedvalue -gt 0} | select instancename,@{Name="SessionID";Expression={if ($_.path.contains("#")){($_.path.split("#)"))[1]}else{"0"}}},@{Name="IO Data Operations/sec";Expression={[math]::Round($_.cookedvalue,0)}} | sort -Descending "IO Data Operations/sec" | ft
$currentqueue=(((get-counter -counter "PhysicalDisk(0 C:)Current Disk Queue Length" -ea 0).countersamples) | select cookedvalue).cookedvalue
clear
write-warning "Hit [CTRL] + [C] to exit live capture"
write-host "Current Disk queue: $currentqueue"
return $Result
}

[/sourcecode]

if you wish to loop one of these functions, simply use the following code:

[sourcecode language=”powershell”]
while ($true){
get-iodataoperations
start-sleep 1
}
[/sourcecode]

Silently installing the Citrix Edgesight ActiveX plugin

Just a really quick blog post on how to silently install the reporting agent inside your environment.

Log into a server / client without the EdgeSight plugin installed, and browse to the edgesight website. Once logged in, you will receive the usual prompt to install the software:

Install the software and ensure it works, then fire up a command prompt and browse down to “c:windowsdownloaded program files”. Once in this folder, a DIR will reveal the ActiveX plugin “csmdbprov.dll”.

Now simply copy this file out to shared storage:

Once done, now its scripting time!

Below are two examples in batch (.bat , .cmd) or PowerShell (.ps1) for achieving this:

(please amend h:csmdbprov.dll to the path you use)

Batch:

[sourcecode language=”text”]
copy h:csmdbprov.dll "c:windowsdownloaded program files"
regsvr32 /s "c:windowsdownloaded program files"
[/sourcecode]

Powershell:

[sourcecode language=”powershell”]
if (test-path h:csmdbprov.dll){
copy-item H:csmdbprov.dll ‘C:WindowsDownloaded Program Files’ -Force
start-process regsvr32 -ArgumentList "/s ""C:WindowsDownloaded Program Filescsmdbprov.dll""" -wait
}
[/sourcecode]

Using powershell as a replacement for the Change Logon command in Remote Desktop Services.

Still on my PowerShell buzz for the week, this is post 2 of 3 on some Remote Desktop Services / XenApp Powershell goodness!

This is one I’ve been meaning to post for quite some time, but other things got in the way. Mainly me forgetting how to use most of the powershell native methods due to having my head stuck in .net the last few weeks… Moving on…

While trying to find a method to check the status of logon’s to a Remote Desktop server via PowerShell, I didn’t have much luck. Either people are string scraping the output of the command using select-string or going to the registry and checking the raw Value with get-itemproperty. I wasn’t happy with either approach so I dug down into WMI and found the following.

From what I’ve found, the settings for enable, disable and the two drain modes are stored under the namespace rootcimv2terminalservices. Under the class Win32_terminalservicesetting.

There are two properties we are interested in here:

  • logons (0 = enabled, 1 = disabled*)
  • SessionBrokerDrainMode (0 = Disabled, 1 = DrainUntilRestart, 2 = Drain)

*why oh why 1 is disabled is beyond me, but I digress.

The order of priority is enabled / disabled first, before the drain options are referenced.

So what does this tell us? Well, a change logon /query is simply performing the following simple checks:

Change Logon /query

[sourcecode language=”powershell”]
gwmi win32_terminalservicesetting -N "rootcimv2terminalservices" | %{
if ($_.logons -eq 1){
"Disabled"}
Else {
switch ($_.sessionbrokerdrainmode)
{
0 {"Enabled"}
1 {"DrainUntilRestart"}
2 {"Drain"}
default {"something’s not right here!"}
}
}
}
[/sourcecode]

Ok that’s great and all, we’ve now replicated change logon /enable, but how do we set these values?

Easy! Using the native PowerShell $_.put() method, we can push values back in.

Below you will find each “Change Logon” option in server 2008 R2 and the corresponding WMI property.

Change logon /Enable

[sourcecode language=”Powershell”]
$temp = (gwmi win32_terminalservicesetting -N "rootcimv2terminalservices")
$temp.sessionbrokerdrainmode=0
$temp.logons=0
$temp.put()
[/sourcecode]

Change Logon /Disable

[sourcecode language=”Powershell”]
$temp = (gwmi win32_terminalservicesetting -N "rootcimv2terminalservices")
$temp.logons=1
$temp.put()
[/sourcecode]

Change Logon /Drain

[sourcecode language=”Powershell”]
$temp = (gwmi win32_terminalservicesetting -N "rootcimv2terminalservices")
$temp.sessionbrokerdrainmode=2
$temp.put()
[/sourcecode]

Change Logon /DrainUntilRestart

[sourcecode language=”Powershell”]
$temp = (gwmi win32_terminalservicesetting -N "rootcimv2terminalservices")
$temp.sessionbrokerdrainmode=1
$temp.put()
[/sourcecode]

And that’s it! now if you want to wrap this up in a function be my guest, or if you would like me to do so just drop me a line.