Category Archives: VMware View

New VMware Fling – Horizon HelpDesk Agent

horizoniconJust a quick note on the blog that I’ve put together a new VMware fling, the first of many (hopefully!).

The VMware Horizon HelpDesk Agent is built on the Horizon HelpDesk API to be a more natural and fluid experience for windows administrators of Horizon. I’ve ensured that this application is as responsive and intuitive as possible by leveraging asynchronous calls where possible to ensure the user is rarely left waiting for responses.

With the HelpDesk Agent, you connect once and maintain your session throughout the day to the subscribed service, once you need it, you simply pull it up via keystroke and begin to search for the user you wish to assist or observe. I’ve optimised the search experience to remove some unnecessary steps and allowed quick access to the users data. You can maintain multiple open windows, access everything with simple key strokes, etc.

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Using the VMware Horizon API from c#

horizoniconSo here’s an ask I’ve had for well over a year, which i duly neglected until the mind of the brilliant Sean Massey decided to send me a PM on the vExpert EUC slack channel.

VMware Horizon’s API has been published for well over a year at this point over on code.vmware.com but there’s two challenges with this API in my humble opinion:

A: it’s WAAAAY too developer orientated for a regular PowerShell consumer*

B: while it’s a fully fledged API it seems a bit shortsighted to only document how to use it from Powershell given that the full API is documented.

* oh don’t have such a high opinion of yourself, everyone complained, i have the emails to prove it!

I had attempted this a few times before, but my usual source of help, Remko was too busy to help me or I duly hit a problem and inevitably toddled off to do something else. Not this time! and with no Remko help! *pats self on the back*

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ThinIO facts and figures, Part 4: Storage design and dangerous assumptions.  

Welcome back to this blog series discussing our new product ThinIO. Please find the below three earlier articles in this series:

In the final blog post in this series, we’re going to discuss storage design and a frequent problem face when sizing storage. Lets get right into it:

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ThinIO facts and figures, Part 2: The Bootstorm chestnut.

logoWelcome back! This blog post is part of a number of posts in advance of our upcoming release, for reference you can find part one below:

Getting right to it:

In this industry when somebody says ‘boot storms!’ – most of us will respond with:

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Boot storms are a well documented, boring problem and have many solutions available from vendors and hypervisors alike. Most solutions today rely on a ‘shared memory’ storage area to cache ‘on boot’, in theory caching only one startup or one pattern in order to then serve it back to the proceeding desktops to boot.

But why are boot storms an issue? While working on ThinIO we had the unique ability to really dive into the Windows boot process and analyse why boot storms cause the damage they do and in this post we thought we’d share our findings to better document the issue.

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ThinIO facts and figures, Part 1: VDI and Ram caching.

Alogos we draw ever closer to ThinIO’s big day, I thought I’d put a blog post together talking about the RAM caching, statistics, facts and figures we’ve baked into version 1 to deliver some really kick ass performance improvements with even the smallest of allocations of cache per VM.

Test, test, review and tune. Rinse and repeat!

We’ve spent months load testing, tuning, fixing and retesting ThinIO. And for the first time we’re going to start talking about the dramatic results ThinIO can have on storage scalability and user perceived performance.

During our extensive testing cycles, we’ve covered:

• Horizon View
• Citrix XenDesktop
• Microsoft RDS

We’ve been seeing very similar, if not identical results when testing against pools on the following storage types too:

• XenServer SR
• VMFS
• NFS
• Microsoft Clustered Shared Volumes

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